Thursday, 13 February 2014

DC vs Marvel... A story without end.





When people think comics, they often think of particular characters and superheroes - Superman, Batman and Spider-Man for example. However, behind many of the biggest characters are the behemoths of the comic book industry, DC Comics and Marvel Enterprises. The competition between them is legendary, which is odd because the rivalry is more a friendly acceptance of each other. The two companies have often collaborated on projects, sharing their best talent and often crossing ideas over: examples of this can be found with DC/Marvel Team Ups, Amalgam Comics, and the revelation that DC's Superman supporting character 'Mr. Mxyzptlk' and Marvel's 'Impossible Man' are one and the same. The bantering of Marvel competing with 'Brand X' while DC referred to its 'other leading brands' - much like soap powder producers - shows the casual atmosphere between the rivals. However, the two companies do have their differences.


Who's Better?


The main differences between DC and Marvel are stylistic. 
DC is evolutionary, constantly changing with the times to remain current and fresh. Marvel is revolutionary, occasionally stirring things up and doing something totally new, but maintaining its original concepts. DC can be compared to a major celebrity that will always be in the spotlight while Marvel a yoyo of brilliance, with huge blockbuster plots and tie-ins, then a drop back into obscurity. The difference in the publications also lies in the concepts of the characters, and this may be a reason why there has been a rise and fall in the popularity of each company's stalwart creations.





Strengths and Weaknesses

All superheroes have strengths and weaknesses, but what are the differences between DC and Marvel characters? DC characters tend to concentrate on their own lives and purpose, while Marvel heroes deal with differing situations at every turn. DC superheroes tend to be proud of their abilities; they have acquired them because they wanted them in most cases (perhaps Superman being an example of the opposite); they are also strong in their ideologies. Marvel characters however, seemingly see their powers as more of a burden and a constraint on leading their own lives (away from being superheroes).


The 'Super' Psyche


DC Comics have endured many changing periods because the characters are a constant. Yet the characters often have emotional or psychological problems to deal with; Batman has angst over the death of his parents, Superman is hurt by the problems of a dual identity, and Wonder Woman is torn between her love of the Amazons and her feelings for the men in her life. DC heroes also have a tendency to develop into larger teams, becoming a family unit such as the JLA (Justice League of America) and the Teen Titans. They are predictable, but loveable, both in their own worlds and by the comic book readers.






Marvel
characters tend to be more erratic, but this could be because the motivations and back stories have altered many times. However the general mood and concept of the hero remains. Marvel characters are all too often threatened by outside influences. While they have internal personal struggles, it is also society that attacks them. The Fantastic Four fight against people's fear of them, Spider-Man is openly rejected (albeit by a biased media) for his vigilantism, as is the Punisher, and the X-Men battle xenophobia. It is both a struggle for them to accept themselves and for society to accept them3.







How do Superheroes Become 'Super'?

For the most part, DC and Marvel follow two different philosophies: DC characters tend to have acquired their powers by supernatural, magical or alien means4, while Marvel characters however seem to have developed powers from scientific accidents or means, whether by exposure to radiation or by genetic mutation5. There are exceptions to this general rule, with DC's Flash (a lab experiment gone wrong) and Marvel's Dr Strange (magical powers passed on), but the fantastical elements are still strong in both.

Where do the Characters Come From?


Both DC and Marvel characters are created from original ideas as well as elements lifted from older, more mythological tales. However, the DC Universe seems to be one that is wholly fictional, with cities and worlds that have no place in reality (Star City, Metropolis, Gotham City and the Dreaming). Marvel heroes tend to come from the guy or girl next door theory - they live in real places, be it New York, Los Angeles or Toronto. This in turn lends DC characters a more surreal edge, able to do and be things unheard of, while the Marvel characters have to live within certain human restraints.






Popularity Contest?


Both companies are hugely popular, often among the same people (comics readers tend to like variety), but their successes have been varied. Both have seen Hollywood excitement over characters - DC in the 1980s and '90s (Superman and Batman enjoying great success), Marvel having a glut of renewed interest in the early 21st Century (X-Men, Spider-Man, Hulk, Daredevil, The Punisher). With the development of other publishers though, most notably Dark Horse Comics and IDW Publishing, the two titans risk becoming just mere gods among the comics world.


The End?

Despite their many differences, both DC and Marvel have entertained us for decades and will continue to do so for years to come, even if they undergo significant change (like the very heroes they have created). Whichever you prefer, you have to admit that greatness runs throughout every page created by these two comic industry giants.






BRAGGING RIGHTS

MARVEL: The Avengers is the biggest comic-book movie in history.

DC: The Dark Knight remains the only comic-book movie to win a major Academy Award (best supporting actor for Heath Ledger).

BRANDED MOVIES (Since 2002)

MARVEL: 25 Spider-Man, Blade II, Daredevil, X2: X-Men United, Hulk, The Punisher, Spider-Man 2, Blade: Trinity, Elektra, Fantastic Four, X3: The Last Stand, Ghost Rider, Spider-Man 3, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, Punisher: War Zone, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Iron Man 2, Thor, X-Men: First Class, Captain America: The First Avenger, Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance, Marvel's The Avengers, The Amazing Spider-Man

DC: 8 Catwoman, Batman Begins, Superman Returns, The Dark Knight, Watchmen, Jonah Hex, Green Lantern, The Dark Knight Rises

BIGGEST MOVIE

MARVEL: The Avengers (total gross: $1.2 billion through 5/24/12)

DC: The Dark Knight (total gross: $1 billion)






BIGGEST FRANCHISE

MARVEL: X-Men (five movies and spin-offs since 2000, with two more pending)

DC: Batman (eight movies and spin-offs since 1989)

UPCOMING MOVIES

MARVEL: 9 Thor 2, Captain America 2, Iron Man 3, X-Men: First Class 2, The Wolverine, The Avengers 2, plus two still to be revealed and a possible Amazing Spider-Man sequel.

DC: 2 The Dark Knight Rises, Man of Steel (the Superman reboot)


BIGGEST RECENT STUMBLE


MARVEL: Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance opened miserably, proving that sequels can't always fool people twice--not even fans of Nicolas Cage movies.

DC: Green Lantern was expensive, critically reviled, and a box-office disappointment that will need a major creative reboot to prove franchise-worthy.




MOST PAINFUL ILLUSTRATION OF THE LIMITS OF SYNERGY

MARVEL: The inability to get all of its franchise characters under one roof. Though the company is now owned by and housed at Disney, Sony still holds the rights to makeSpider-Man movies, and Fantastic Four, Daredevil, X-Men, and its various offshoots all belong to 20th Century Fox.

DC: Although the company--home to Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and the Flash--was once seen as the repository of characters even more valuable than Marvel's, that's changed in the past five years as Marvel has made one successful movie after another and Warner Brothers has failed to make any kind of grand plan that would lead to an 
Avengers-style Justice League movie.




The Ultimate Showdown
How Marvel and DC measure up by the numbers.

TOTAL DOMESTIC BOX OFFICE GROSS (SINCE 2002)MARVEL $4.28 Billion | DC $1.25 Billion

TOTAL FOREIGN BOX OFFICE (SINCE 2002)MARVEL 5.01 Billion | DC $1.38 Billion

BEST-SELLING COMIC BOOK (APRIL 2012)MARVEL (Avengers vs. X-Men #2) 158,650 copies | DC (Batman #8) 130,602 copies
MONTHLY COMIC BOOK SALES (APRIL 2012)MARVEL $9.4M | DC $7.1M

VIDEO GAMES IN TOP 10 (SINCE 2011)MARVEL 0 | DC (Batman: Arkham City) 1

LIVE-ACTION TV SERIES (SINCE 2002)MARVEL 2 | DC 3

ANIMATED TV SERIES (SINCE 2002)MARVEL 11 | DC 11
MOST FERTILE CREATIVE PERIOD
MARVEL: 1961 to 1964, which saw the creation of the Fantastic Four, Hulk, Thor, Spider-Man, Daredevil, Iron Man, and X-Men.

DC: 1938 to 1941, which saw the creation of Superman, Batman, the Flash, Green Lantern, and Wonder Woman.

SMARTEST RECENT GAMBLE
MARVEL: The decision to build to The Avengers over four years and five movies, starting with Iron Man, paid off brilliantly.

DC: The decision to restart all of its comic books from issue No. 1 last summer resulted in great press and amped-up sales, and the digital day-and-date release of all of its titles, though not yet a major driver of revenue, feels like a potential game-changer.


AND FINALLY, IF SUPERHEROES COULD REALLY TRAVEL BACK AND ALTER THE TIME STREAM, YOU NEVER WOULD HAVE SEEN...

MARVEL: Ang Lee's Hulk

DC: Nipples on the Bat-suit



And this is a war that never stop...
My personal opinion...I really like both companies.
I have my DC favorites characters and My marvel favorites characters and I thing that we should stop fight about which is better and just enjoy our comic books. end of story.

Thanks for Reading...

George...




article info by:bbc.co.uk/fastcompany.com